Cambridge in the Know by Cindy Leaney

In the Know Students Book and Audio CD: Understanding and Using Idioms

In the Know Students Book and Audio CD: Understanding and Using Idioms

In the Know teaches over 800 colorful idioms in English. The book groups the idioms into units depending on whether the idioms relate to such concepts as danger or honesty, or whether they contain colors or parts of the body, etc. Each unit has a clear four-page format that presents the idioms, explores their meaning, and practices their use.

 

Idiomatic English is fun, interesting, and colorful. Your English will sound more natural when you can use idioms successfully. You will be able to understand more of what you read and hear too. This book is designed to help you feel more confident using idioms and to give you more control over them by understanding their meaning, their grammar, how they look and sound, and when and where to use them.

 

In the Know Students Book and Audio CD: Understanding and Using Idioms

In the Know Students Book and Audio CD: Understanding and Using Idioms

How does this book work?

In the Know units are grouped into three parts: Contexts, Concepts, and Key words.

The Context units contain idioms that are used in topics or situations like travel, work, or eating and drinking.

The idioms in the Concept units are linked by a common theme, such as danger, ability, or success.

Idioms in the Key word units are grouped by similar words in the idioms themselves, rather than their meaning, for example, colors or parts of the body.

Each unit has a presentation section of idioms and their meanings. Listen to the presentation section on the audio CD when you start a new unit.

The presentation section is followed by an activities section, which practices the meaning, form (grammar, spelling, pronunciation), and use (register and appropriacy, personalization) of the idioms.

The Reference section is based on the Cambridge Dictionary of American Idioms and includes full definitions of all the idioms in the book with example sentences and usage notes.

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Check your vocabulary for Living in the UK by Rawdon Wyatt

Check your vocabulary for Living in the UK by Rawdon Wyatt

Check Your English Vocabulary for Living in the UK: All You Need To Pass Your Exams

Check Your Vocabulary workbooks are aimed at learners of English who want to build vocabulary in a specific area. Check Your Vocabulary for Living in the UK is a new title in the range which focuses on the everyday English vocabulary required for would-be British citizens and people for whom English is a second language who want to live, study and work in the UK.

 

Check your vocabulary for Living in the UK by Rawdon Wyatt

Check your vocabulary for Living in the UK by Rawdon Wyatt

Like all titles in the Check Your Vocabulary range, Check Your Vocabulary for Living in the UK will comprise quizzes, word games, and puzzles that help teach and build vocabulary in a stimulating way.

This book has been written for anyone coming to live and/or work in the United Kingdom, and who wants to:

  •  test and develop their knowledge of the keywords and expressions that they might need or encounter on a day-to-day basis.
  •  learn about different aspects of the United Kingdom, including its history, politics, laws, rules, institutions, and way of life.

The book contains exercises that present the vocabulary and information in a lively and interesting way. Crosswords, quizzes, gap-fills and other tasks mean that you will test and develop your knowledge in an active way.

When you use the book, you should not go through the exercises ‘mechanically’. It is better to choose areas that are of particular interest, or areas that you feel would be particularly relevant to your needs.

The exercises are accompanied by a full key at the back. This not only gives you all the answers but also provides you with a lot of other information that might be useful.

It is important to record new words and expressions that you learn. Try to develop your own personal vocabulary ‘bank’ in a notebook or file. Review the words and expressions on a regular basis so that they become a part of your ‘productive’ vocabulary.

You will find it very helpful to use a dictionary when you do the exercises. A good dictionary will give a clear definition of words and expressions, show you how they are pronounced, and give sample sentences that show how they are used in context. The Macmillan English Dictionary (ISBN 978-0333-964828) is particularly recommended, as it also provides a lot of background information on the United Kingdom and its various institutions.

Many of exercises and questions in this book are based on the things you will need to know if you are going to take the Home Office Life in the UK Test. The UK Home Office produces a very useful book called Life in the United Kingdom: A Journey to Citizenship (ISBN 978-0113-413027), which we recommend as a reference source. You might also like to consider the British Citizenship Test Study Guide, published by Red Squirrel Publishing (ISBN 978-0955-215919), which contains typical Citizenship Test questions.

One further resource and one that would be particularly helpful when using this book would be a detailed large-scale map of the United Kingdom. These are usually available from the travel section of any well-stocked bookshop.

While you are using this book, you should note that national rules and laws are constantly changing and evolving, and while the information in this book was correct when it went to print, there may have been changes since then. You can keep up to date by checking the website www.direct.gov.uk, which provides public service information from the UK government, and includes useful directories and links to online services.

This book is not an official text relating to the Home Office Life in the UK Test. For further information about all aspects of British Citizenship and the Life in the UK Test, visit www.lifeintheuktest.gov.uk.

Please also note that this book is not intended to provide advice of a statutory or regulatory nature, nor is it a statement of the law. For advice and assistance regarding employment, health and social welfare, legal and other matters, contact should be made with an appropriate body, such as Citizens’ Advice.

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Check your vocabulary for Leisure, Travel, and Tourism by Rawdon Wyatt

Check your vocabulary for Leisure, Travel, and Tourism by Rawdon Wyatt

Check Your English Vocabulary for Leisure, Travel, and Tourism: All you need to improve your vocabulary

Check Your English Vocabulary for Leisure, Travel and Tourism by Rawdon Wyatt provides exercises to help teach and build English vocabulary relevant to the hotel, tourism and catering industries. It has been written both for students studying towards professional exams and for those who want to improve their specialist communication skills. The material covers general and topic-specific vocabulary, as well as grammar and use of English, comprehension, pronunciation and spelling. Together with the companion Dictionary of Leisure, Travel and Tourism (0-7475-7222-4), this workbook provides a complete package to help students improve their specialist English.

 

Check your vocabulary for Leisure, Travel, and Tourism by Rawdon Wyatt

Check your vocabulary for Leisure, Travel, and Tourism by Rawdon Wyatt

Who is this book for?

This book has been written for anyone working, or planning to work, in the leisure, travel and tourism industry, and who wants to develop their vocabulary for this line of work. The various exercises throughout the book focus on the key vocabulary that you would expect to understand and use on a day-to-day basis.

 

How should you use the book?

When you use this book, you should not go through the exercises mechanically. It is better to choose areas that you are unfamiliar with, or areas that you feel are of specific interest or importance to yourself.

The exercises are accompanied by a full answer key at the back of the book. This key also gives you lots of other information that might be useful to you, as well as providing other words (opposites, alternative words, etc) that are not covered in the exercises themselves. There are also some tasks that will give you the opportunity to practise using the vocabulary in context.

It is important to record new words and expressions that you learn. Try to develop your own personal vocabulary ‘bank’ in a notebook or file. Review the words and expressions on a regular basis so that they become an active part of your vocabulary.

The following books were consulted during the writing of this book, and you might find them useful if you want to find out more about leisure, travel and tourism. The vocabulary covered in this book is not completely exhaustive, so you will also find these sources very helpful if you want to develop your travel vocabulary further:

  •  Dictionary of Leisure, Travel and Tourism (Bloomsbury Publishing, 0-7475-7222-4)
  • Dictionary of Travel, Tourism and Hospitality (S. Medlik, Butterworth Heinemann,0-7506-5650-6)
  •  Tourism Management (Stephen J Page, Butterworth Heinemann, 0-7506-5752-9)
  •  An Introduction to Tourism (Leonard J Lickorish and Carson L Jenkins, Elsevier, 0-7506-1956-2)
  •  In Search of Hospitality (Edited by Conrad Lashley and Alison Morrison, Butterworth Heinemann, 0-7506-5431-7)
  •  The International Hospitality Industry (Edited by Bob Brotherton, Butterworth Heinemann, 0-7506-5295-0)
  •  Check your Vocabulary series (various authors, Bloomsbury)

The author also made use of a large range of travel- and tourism-related websites on the Internet, as well as holiday brochures and other information freely available from travel agencies and tour operators.

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Check your vocabulary for Law by Rawdon Wyatt

Check Your English Vocabulary for Law

Check Your English Vocabulary for Law: All you need to improve your vocabulary

Check Your English Vocabulary for Law by Rawdon Wyatt is a workbook designed to help non-native English speakers improve their knowledge and understanding of core legal terminology. The workbook includes crosswords, puzzles, and word games to test English vocabulary and a combination of self-study exercises and practical speaking activities mean that this book is ideal for both home- and class-based study.

This book has been written for anyone working or training to work in the legal profession, or for anyone whose job requires them to have a working knowledge of legal words and terms. The various exercises throughout the book focus on the key vocabulary that you might be expected to understand and use on a day-to-day basis.

Check Your English Vocabulary for Law

Check Your English Vocabulary for Law

You should not go through the exercises in this book mechanically. It is better to choose areas that you are unfamiliar with, or areas that you feel are of specific interest or importance to yourself.

Each exercise is accompanied by a full answer key at the back of the book. This key also gives you other information about particular vocabulary items (for example, words with similar meanings, alternative words and expressions, etc) that are not covered in the exercises themselves.

When you are doing the exercises, there are a few important points you should consider:

1. Many of the words, expressions and accompanying notes are based primarily on the English and Welsh legal system. However, there are also many ‘generic’ words which can be applied across the international legal spectrum, and would be recognised in other places such as the USA and Canada.

2. Not all of the vocabulary practised in this book is legal vocabulary per se (see page 45 to find out what this expression means), but would be used in a legal context (for example, at a trial or tribunal, or when producing a contract or negotiating business terms).

3. A lot of the words and expressions which have been presented here in a particular context (for example, words connected with a criminal law procedure) might also ‘cross over’ into other areas of law. A jury, for example, is usually employed at a criminal trial, but might also be used in some civil cases, such as libel.

It is very important to keep a record of new words and expressions that you learn. On page 64 of this book, you will find a vocabulary record sheet which you can photocopy as many times as you like and use to build up a ‘bank’ of useful words and expressions. It is accompanied on the following page by a sample sheet that shows you how to record a particular vocabulary item. Keep your record sheets in a file or folder and review them on a regular basis so that the words and expressions become an ‘active’ part of your legal vocabulary.

We recommend that you keep a good dictionary with you, and refer to it when necessary. Many of the words and expressions in this book (together with their definitions) can be found in the A & C Dictionary of Law. For general vocabulary reference, the Macmillan English Dictionary is also an excellent resource.

No vocabulary book can possibly contain all of the legal words and expressions that you are likely to come across or need, so it is important you acquire new vocabulary from other sources. On the next page you will find a short list of useful sources that were consulted during the writing of this book, and you should also read as much as possible from a variety of other sources, including journals, papers and case reports (many of which are available on the Internet).

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Check your vocabulary for IELTS by Rawdon Wyatt

Check Your English Vocabulary for IELTS

Check Your English Vocabulary for IELTS: Essential words and phrases to help you maximize your IELTS score

This bestselling workbook provides a resource for students studying towards the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) exam. It has been written for students at intermediate level and above and is particularly appropriate for anyone who plans to study or train at an English-speaking college or university.

Fully updated for this fourth edition, the book provides exercises to help teach and build general and topic-specific vocabulary related to the IELTS test and also covers grammar, use of English, comprehension, and spelling.

Suitable for both self-study and the classroom, it includes a range of activities to help students build and improve their English vocabulary and language skills.

– Tests and improves vocabulary using a variety of useful, interesting and enjoyable exercises
– Easy-to-use format with clear instructions
– Comprehensive answer key with additional information
– Includes IELTS-style Speaking and Writing tasks with sample answers to allow for productive practice of target language

 

Check Your English Vocabulary for IELTS

Check Your English Vocabulary for IELTS

This workbook has been written for students who are planning to sit either the Academic or General Training modules of the IELTS examination. It covers some of the main vocabulary areas that you will need for, or come across it, the Listening, Reading, Writing and Speaking sections of the exam.

Structure of the Book

Each vocabulary area is presented in the form of a self-contained module with task-based activities which present each vocabulary item in context.

• Pages 1 – 5 7 focus on general! vocabulary items. Some of these are relevant to specific tasks or questions in the IELTS examination (for example, describing how something works, talking about changes shown in a graph or table, saying where things are and following directions).

• Pages 5 8 -1 0 4 focus on topic-specific vocabulary areas which may be required in the examination (for example, education, architecture, family matters and science and technology).

Each module consists of three tasks: the first two present vocabulary items in context, each with a practice or recognition exercise, and the third gives you the opportunity to review the vocabulary in a gap-fill exercise.

• Pages 1 0 5 -1 2 4 contain a comprehensive key so you can check your answers. The answer key also gives additional information about specific vocabulary items or general vocabulary areas, as well as other useful words or phrases.

 

Using the workbook

You should not work through the book mechanically from beginning to end. It is better to choose areas that you are unfamiliar with, or areas that you feel are of specific interest or importance to yourself.

 

Recording, reviewing and extending your vocabulary.

Remember that you should keep a record of new words, phrases, and expressions that you acquire, and review these on a regular basis so that they become part of your active vocabulary. Also, remember that there are other ways of acquiring new vocabulary. For example, you should read as much as possible from a variety of authentic reading materials (books, newspapers, magazines, web-based articles, etc.).

 

 

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500 Words, Phrases, Idioms for the TOEFL iBT Plus Typing Strategies

500 Words, Phrases, Idioms for the TOEFL iBT Plus Typing Strategies

500 Words, Phrases, Idioms for the TOEFL iBT Plus Typing Strategies by Bruce Stirling

HOW IS THIS TOEFL BOOK DIFFERENT?

This TOEFL book is different because it uses an integrated vocabulary learning system called recycling. Recycling is simple. Each exercise is divided into four quizzes. Quiz 1, a multiple-choice vocabulary quiz, introduces ten new words. Next, you will do Quiz 2. Quiz 2 is a sentence-completion quiz based on the ten words in Quiz 1. Next, you will do Quiz 3, a spelling quiz. The speaker on the audio file will say the same ten words in turn. You will then have ten seconds to spell each word by saying it and typing it. Finally, you will do Quiz 4. Quiz 4 is a 60-word typing test based on the ten new words you have been recycling through Quizzes 1, 2 and 3, plus words, phrases, and idioms recycled from previous exercises.

500 Words, Phrases, Idioms for the TOEFL iBT Plus Typing Strategies

500 Words, Phrases, Idioms for the TOEFL iBT Plus Typing Strategies

BONUS MATERIAL

Learn essential rhetorical strategies and a test-proven way to develop opinion-based and fact-based TOEFL essays.

Audio included through Internet download.

 

Who is this book for?

Are you studying for the TOEFL test? Do you need to learn academic English vocabulary to increase your TOEFL score? Do you also need to improve your typing skills so you can type your TOEFL essays faster and more accurately on test day? If you said “Yes!” to any of these questions, then this book is for you.

Now you can download 500 Words, Phrases, Idioms for the TOEFL iBT Plus Typing Strategies by Bruce Stirling PDF Book below lin here:

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Barron’s 504 Absolutely Essential Words

504 Absolutely Essential Words

504 Absolutely Essential Words 6th Edition by Murray Bromberg,‎ Julius Liebb,‎ Arthur Traiger

This updated vocabulary-building book presents the essential core of words that students at middle-school and higher levels must know and be able to use fluently for academic success. These words also constitute essential vocabulary for ESL students and test-takers, as well as others who speak English as their second language. The authors present a series of brief word-building lessons, each introducing 12 new words that are presented in sample sentences and short articles. Fill-in-the-blanks exercises help students measure their word-building progress. Informed with clear yet simple definitions and examples, readers will find their vocabulary has improved dramatically.

This is a self-help book. If you use it intelligently, you will help yourself to strengthen and expand your word knowledge. The words you will learn, moreover, are essential in that they are known and used regularly by educated people. You will find that such words as squander, rehabilitate, blunder, obesity, and five hundred more will turn up in your newspapers, in the magazines you read, in books, on television, in the movies, and in the conversation of the people you meet daily.

504 Absolutely Essential Words is divided into 42 lessons, each containing 12 new words. Those words are first presented to you in three sample sentences; next, the new words appear in a brief passage; the last part of each lesson is a set of exercises that give you practice using the new words. One of the most important features of 504 … Words is that each of the new words is repeated over and over again throughout this book so that you will have a greater chance to become familiar with it.

Included are seven Word Review sections, each containing challenging exercises that will help you to test your mastery of the new words.
Newly added are interesting exercises in letter writing and parts of speech that will familiarize you with our basic 504 essential words. Finally, this 6th edition features frequently misspelled words, a Bonus Review, a Bonus Lesson with 125 More Difficult (But Essential) Words, and a new section called Panorama ofWords.

HOW TO USE THIS BOOK

504 Absolutely Essential Words

504 Absolutely Essential Words

504 Absolutely Essential Words can be used in a number of ways, depending upon the needs and the status of the reader. A student in a high school English class, for example, could work with the book over a period of one school year, learning a dozen words each week for 42 weeks. Pupils who are studying vocabulary in an individualized program can move through the text at their own speed, mastering the new words as rapidly as they are able. Adults, out of school, can dip into the book on a selective basis, paying attention to the new words and skipping over those with which they are already familiar.

The High School English Class Some teachers prefer to set aside one day a week for intensive vocabulary study. At such time the sentences containing the new words are often read aloud so that the students hear them used in context. The definitions may be copied into a vocabulary notebook to reinforce the learning. Next, the accompanying paragraph(s) containing the 12 new words should be read aloud, followed by the exercise in which the blanks are to be filled in. Some discussion of the “Spotlight On” word is appropriate, preceding a homework assignment in which the students compose original sentences for
each of the new words.

Independent Study An interesting way to approach 504 Absolutely Essential Words on one’s own is to take an informal pretest on each week’s words, comparing the definitions with the ones provided in the text. After studying the three sample sentences, the reader should compose several original ones, using the model paragraph( s) for resource material.

The “Spotlight On” word introduces students to the fascinating history of the English language. They are advised to look up other words in each lesson in order to find out about their origin and to expand their vocabulary in the process. Finally, students who are working on their own should complete the exercises at the end of each section, filling in the blanks and striving for a perfect score. Repetition The words with asterisks ( *) are those that have been taught in previous lessons. They are planted everywhere in the book since the repetition of newly learned material is a recognized road to mastery. If you come across such a word but cannot remember its meaning, turn back to the lesson in which that word first appeared. (See the index on pages 200-202 for such information.)

Now you can download 504 Absolutely Essential Words 6th Edition by Murray Bromberg,‎ Julius Liebb,‎ Arthur Traiger below link here:

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Mastering the American Accent by Lisa Mojsin

Mastering the American Accent

This combination book and an audio instructional program are designed to diminish the accents of men and women who speak English as their second language. It will help them speak standard American English with clarity, confidence, and accuracy. Specific exercises concentrate on vowel sounds, problematic consonants such as V, W, B, TH, and the American R, employ correct syllable stress, link words for smoother speech flow, use common word contractions such as won’t instead of will not, and more. Additional topics that often confuse ESL students are also discussed and explained. They include distinguishing between casual and formal speech, homophones (for instance, they’re and there), recognizing words with silent letters (comb, receipt, and others), and avoiding embarrassing pronunciation mistakes, such as mixing up party and potty. Students are familiarized with many irregular English spelling rules and exceptions and are shown how such irregularities can contribute to pronunciation errors. A native languag

Mastering the American Accent

Mastering the American Accent

e guide references problematic accent issues of 13 different language backgrounds. Correct lip and tongue positions for all sounds are discussed in detail. Enclosed with the book are four compact discs that use male and female voices to coach correct American-style pronunciation.

 

 

About author

Lisa Mojsin has been teaching accent reduction in Los Angeles for over twenty years. She is director of Accurate English, an accent reduction training company. (accurateenglish.com) She specializes in working with actors in Hollywood, TV announcers, and business professionals for whom correct pronunciation is a must. She is passionate about helping non-native speakers of English communicate confidence, clarity, and accuracy.

Her typical non-entertainment industry clients are foreign-born physicians, lawyers, software engineers and corporate professionals.

She has a master’s degree in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages. She taught at Santa Monica College, West Los Angeles College, and UCLA-Extension. She also taught in China, Germany, and New Zealand and has worked as an interpreter in France and for the Olympic Games.

She developed a passion for accents and correct pronunciation when she was getting her bachelor’s degree in French and German from UCLA.

She speaks five languages.

Now you can Download Mastering the American Accent by Lisa Mojsin PDF Book + Audio CD below link here:

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Check your vocabulary for Human Resources by Rawdon Wyatt

This workbook provides exercises to help teach and build English vocabulary. It has been written both for students who are studying towards professional exams and for those who want to improve their related communication skills. The material covers general and topic-specific vocabulary, as well as grammar and use of English, comprehension, pronunciation, and spelling.

Check Your English Vocabulary for Human Resources: All you need to pass your exams

This workbook provides exercises to help teach and build English vocabulary. It has been written both for students who are studying towards professional exams and for those who want to improve their related communication skills. The material covers general and topic-specific vocabulary, as well as grammar and use of English, comprehension, pronunciation, and spelling.

Who is this book for?

This book has been written for anyone working, or planning to work, in human resources and personnel management, and who wants to develop their vocabulary for this line of work. The various exercises throughout the book focus on the key vocabulary that you would expect to understand and use on a day-to-day basis.

The book is also useful for anyone working in other business-related areas (secretarial, administrative, accountancy, sales, business law, business management, etc) who wants to broaden their knowledge of business vocabulary.

This workbook provides exercises to help teach and build English vocabulary. It has been written both for students who are studying towards professional exams and for those who want to improve their related communication skills. The material covers general and topic-specific vocabulary, as well as grammar and use of English, comprehension, pronunciation, and spelling.

This workbook provides exercises to help teach and build English vocabulary. It has been written both for students who are studying towards professional exams and for those who want to improve their related communication skills. The material covers general and topic-specific vocabulary, as well as grammar and use of English, comprehension, pronunciation, and spelling.

How should you use the book?

When you use this book, you should not go through the exercises mechanically. It is better to choose areas that you are unfamiliar with, or areas that you feel are of specific interest or importance to yourself.

The exercises are accompanied by a full answer key at the back of the book. This key also gives you lots of other information that might be useful to you, as well as providing other words (synonyms, opposites, alternative words, etc) that are not covered in the exercises themselves.

It is important to record new words and expressions that you learn. Try to develop your own personal vocabulary ‘bank’ in a notebook or file. Review the words and expressions on a regular basis so that they become an active part of your vocabulary.

You will find it very helpful to use a dictionary when you do the exercises in this book. A good dictionary will give a clear definition of words and expressions, show you how they are pronounced, and give sample sentences to show how they are used in context. Many of the words, expressions and examples in this book have been taken or adapted from the Bloomsbury Dictionary of Human Resources and Personnel Management (ISBN 0 74756623 2). You will also find the Bloomsbury Easier English Dictionary for Students (ISBN 0 7475 6624 0) a useful reference source.

 

About the Author

 

Rawdon Wyatt is the author of numerous other vocabulary preparation books, including ones for the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) and the First Certificate in English (FCE) exams.

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5 more Secrets to Language Learning Success

Eric E. Gordon

As you’ve just seen, you don’t need to be in a classroom to keep improving your English language skills – there are lots of other ways.

Here are some easy techniques that you can use just about anywhere and anytime. And if you use them regularly you will be well on the way to becoming a great communicator in English.

1. Two heads are better than one

There are many different ways that you can practice speaking and you should get into a habit where you employ at least one or two of these methods for practice each day or week.

Practice with a friend; find a partner who is also learning English and set aside a time where you both communicate in English each day or week. By phone, online, or in person, conduct your everyday conversation through English over a coffee or tea and don’t worry if you need to fill in some gaps with your native language, just use as much English as you can and keep these chats regular.

Put learning into usage; look for an opportunity to use the recent language you have learned in conversation as soon as you have learned it to ensure that it becomes an active part of your range. As you learn a new phrase, make sure that you keep it top of mind so that you can use it at the next opportunity.

 

Two heads are better than one

Two heads are better than one

2. Keep a dictionary handy

Always keep a dictionary at hand. If you have a pocket dictionary, keep it with you or if you have a smartphone, then find a dictionary website that provides access that you can keep in your bookmarks. When you come across a new word, check it in your dictionary and make a quick note of the word so you can come back to it later.

When you have some spare time, familiarise yourself with the different styles and symbols that your dictionary will use as this will help you later when you need to quickly access definitions and meaning from the dictionary. For example, many dictionaries will use abbreviations or shortened words to explain the word or phrase in focus. Examples include:

Vb – verb

Adj – adjective

Syn – synonym

 

When you do look up a word in the dictionary, ensure you expand your knowledge by reading through the list of synonyms. A synonym is a word that has the same or nearly the same meaning such as ‘happy’, ‘joyful’ and ‘elated’. It is a good idea to look at the list of synonyms as this can help you to attach other words that you may know to the new word that you have just learned.

 

An English dictionary is always handy

An English dictionary is always handy

3. Turn the subtitles on

English movies are a great and fun way to build up your language skills and can be very useful to practice listening, pronunciation and build up your vocabulary. As well, viewing movies in English will expose you to some very natural and authentic exchanges in everyday situations.

Where you can, turn on the English subtitles for movies and listen and follow along. Use the pause and rewind functions to pick up on any vocabulary or phrases you are not sure about or that you are interested in. If there are close-ups of the actors then use the close-ups as an opportunity to study how they are making different words through the mouth and facial movements, then pause and practice those sounds yourself. You might even find it helpful to use a mirror and imitate the sounds and movements yourself.

Active listening is a very useful way to improve your skills, listen to what you hear and apply it. If you have the captions on, turn them off and listen to what you hear and write down what you hear. Listen, pause and then write what you hear and then rewind and come back and check your understanding. This type of dictation will help you focus on the individual sounds in and around words, as well as how words link and the different stress points in those linkages.

 

Watching English movies with sub-titles is a good way to learn the language

Watching English movies with sub-titles is a good way to learn the language

4. Listen to the radio

It is important to listen to different voices and the more the better. Listening to the radio is one way that you can keep your awareness of the sounds of English active and at the same time, work on your pronunciation. There are many different options for free radio both online and through shortwave. Find out what radio stations operate in your area in English and familiarise yourself with some of the programmings and if you can, arrange your schedule so you can listen to a broadcast or part of a broadcast each day or week.

Pronunciation is a key part of learning a language and can be done in many different ways. Just focusing on a word and listening to syllabus stress and practicing the right form yourself can be very productive. To do this you need to find the correct version of the word. and this can often be found as an audio file in most free online dictionaries. Look for the icon that indicates ‘to listen’.

Listen to the word and then imitate the sounds you hear. Again, this might be aided by using a mirror where you can watch as you make the sounds of English.

 

Listen to the radio

Listen to the radio

5. Use it don’t lose it

Look to attach the English language to everyday situations, as you are working or as you are in your house think about the situations you are in and use English to describe it. If you talk to someone on the phone for example, after the phone call thinks about how you would conduct that conversation in English. Pick a few phrases and key vocabulary and think about how you would use that in the phone conversation.

Use it don't lose it

Use it don’t lose it

If you want to practice speaking you could even say the phrase aloud and pretend that you are still talking on the phone, only, you are speaking in English, although you might need to be home by yourself to do this!

Identify at least two or three sources of English content to use regularly, these might be websites, newspapers, social media sites or books. Once you have found them, get into the habit of activating some key learning techniques. One way is to keep a notebook list of new words, write the new word down and then write an example sentence using the word or phrase. Note the form of the word – is it an adjective, a noun, an adverb or a verb? If it is a verb then write down the different forms of the verb. If you want, even translate the word into your own language.

Keep your list handy and when you have a few spare minutes open it and review your new vocabulary and make sure you use those new words whenever and as soon as you can. After all, the only way to successfully learn a foreign language is hard work and, practice, practice, and practice.

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Check Your English Vocabulary for FCE+ by Rawdon Wyatt

Check Your English Vocabulary for FCE+ by Rawdon Wyatt

Check Your English Vocabulary for FCE+ (Check Your Vocabulary)

This workbook is designed to help students studying for the Fce (First Certificate Examination). This University of Cambridge exam is taken by over 250,000 people worldwide every year and is one of the most popular English Language Teaching (Elt) exams.

It includes a range of activities to help students build and improve their English vocabulary, and it is suitable for both self-study and classroom use.

About the Author

Rawdon Wyatt is the author of numerous other vocabulary preparation books, including ones for the International English Language Testing System (IELTS), the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) and the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) exams.

Check Your English Vocabulary for FCE+ by Rawdon Wyatt

Check Your English Vocabulary for FCE+ by Rawdon Wyatt

Who is this book for?

This book has been written for students who are planning to take the Cambridge First Certificate in English (the FCE) and who want to develop their vocabulary for the exam.

The various exercises throughout the book focus on the vocabulary that FCE students would expect to use in the Speaking, Writing and Use of English papers, or that they might come across in the Reading or Listening papers.

Why is the book called ‘Check your vocabulary: FCE +?

It is also ideal for students who are going to take the Certificate in Advanced English (the CAE) within the next 6 – 12 months and would like to review / reinforce their vocabulary.

Furthermore, unlike other FCE vocabulary resources, it also looks at some of the ‘real’ English that native speakers use in their everyday lives – idioms, colloquialisms, slang expressions and so on.
Non-exam students at an intermediate or upper-intermediate level will also find the book ideal for developing their vocabulary.

How is the book organised?

There are two parts in the book:

Part 1 focuses on general vocabulary items that would be useful in the exam as a whole (for example, word forms, phrasal verbs, prepositions, language of contrast, and uses of common verbs such as make and do).

Part 2 focuses on common topics that often come up in the FCE exam and which students might need to speak or write about (for example, the environment, money, shopping and relationships).

There is a complete answer key at the back.

How should you use the book?

When you use this book, you should not go through the exercises mechanically. It is better to choose areas that you are unfamiliar with, or areas that you feel are of specific interest or importance to yourself.

Remember that you should keep a record of new words and expressions that you learn, and review these from time to time so that they become an active part of your vocabulary. Some students keep a notebook or file specifically for this purpose.

Also remember that there are other methods of acquiring new vocabulary. For example, you should read as much as possible from a different variety of authentic reading materials (books, newspapers, magazines, etc).

To help you learn English, you should use an English dictionary that can clearly define words, provide information about grammar and give sample sentences to show how words are used in context. You can use any good English learner’s dictionary with this workbook. Many of the sample sentences in the book have been taken or adapted from the Easier English Dictionary for Students.

Now you can Download Check Your English Vocabulary for FCE+ (Check Your Vocabulary) below link here:

Download PDF Book .      Support Author on Amazon

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7 tips to help you remember new words

7 tips to help you remember new words

One of the most common questions from our Learn English community is ‘How can I remember new words?‘ Here are some of our top tips to help you!

1. Look it up

If you come across a word you don’t know, try to find out what it means.

Look up the meaning in a dictionary or ask someone for help to understand it.

Write down the meaning in English and in your own language.

Look it up

Look it up

2. Use it

It’s easy to remember a new word for a few minutes – but how can you remember it after a day or a week?

The trick is to use it. Use it in a sentence. Try to make a creative, memorable sentence, something you can picture and that will stay in your mind.

Write down three creative sentences using the new word, then read them out loud. If it helps, you can even draw a picture to help remember the meaning of your sentence.

Can you tell a story using different forms of the word? It’s very hard to remember a list of words – but it’s easy to remember a story.

Write it Down

Write it Down

3. Try out phrases and different forms

Sometimes it can be easier to learn a phrase than learn each word individually.

So if you’re learning the word ‘focus’ you could write down the meanings of ‘focus on’ and ‘out of focus’. What does it mean to ‘focus your mind on something’ or ‘focus your attention on something’. What does it mean if you ‘lose your focus’?

Now that you have the bigger picture, it’s easier to understand the full meaning of the word.

Don’t forget to try using it in different tenses as well.

Trying different English phrases is important

Trying different English phrases is important

4. Talk about it

We often remember things better when we learn ‘actively’. That means instead of just listening, or just reading, you should be active in trying to speak, read, write and listen.

Now that you know what the word means and you’ve tried writing it down in different ways, tell a friend about the new word. Sometimes teaching someone else can help you remember, too.

If you’re nervous about trying out a new word, practice at home first. You can even record yourself explaining the new word on your phone before you try telling someone else.

Talk about it

Talk about it

5. Use games and technology

Many people find playing games is a good way to help build their understanding. You could write words on flashcards and test yourself or a friend to make a sentence with each word.

Or you can try describing the meaning of the word to your friend without showing them the card.

Or maybe try a role play? That’s when you act out a scene, for example, if you’re trying to learn words related to shopping, you and a friend can take turns pretending to be the shop owner and a customer – how much is this?

Remember you can play these games with friends anywhere in the world: Use your phone to record your voice or make a video and send it to a friend.

Or record a conversation with a native speaker so you can listen to it later.

Use games and technology

Use games and technology

6. Don’t give up

Don’t try to do too much too quickly. It’s very hard to remember a long list of words. Maybe it’s better to learn one word a day, or a list of eight words a week. It all depends how much time you have to practice.

Be realistic about what you can do each day. You don’t have to be perfect; remember that even native English speakers make mistakes.

Successful learners have clear goals, are motivated, and stick to their plan – to keep trying!

Don't give up learning a new language.

Don’t give up learning a new language.

7. Sleep!

Did you know that if you sleep within a few hours of learning something new you’ll be better at remembering what you’ve learned?

So that’s a great reason to practice new words before bedtime. Let your brain do the work while you sleep!

But don’t forget to review your new words and phrases in the morning too.

Getting enough sleep is important.

Getting enough sleep is important.

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